April 10, 2015 sistatalks

10 wedding tips you won’t get from a bridal magazine

10. Everyone makes a list of things to pack
Have you spent hours creating those programmers/fans? Did you create your own photo booth? Have you hand-crafted several ornate decorations that you plan to hang onto for several years? You’d be amazed at what people leave on site and forget to collect, simply because they think someone else has arranged to bring these keepsakes back.

Very often these things aren’t noticed until you come back from the honeymoon, in which case the venue may have unwittingly thrown them out. The best way to circumvent this is to not only give your bridal party a list of things you must have back from the venue but make sure the venue coordinator has a list of this as well. That way, if anything gets lost in the shuffle, your venue coordinator will know to hang onto it for you until you get back from the honeymoon, or can make other arrangements for delivery.

9. Assign someone you trust to download as many photos as possible before your guests leave the party.
All of us already know that one of the great things about weddings today is that almost everyone brings a digital camera. And although many of us also hire professional photographers, we still would like copies of the photos our guests have taken.

The best way to expedite this process is to brief someone who is a trusted friend to be your photo catcher. Their job is to download as many memory sticks as possible onto a designated laptop before your guests leave. If you catch people right then and there, you have a much better chance of getting all the images you’d like and without the hassle of chasing them down later.

You’ll probably also have the best luck getting images if your photo catcher is NOT in the wedding party. We asked my dad to take on this role, but as a member of the wedding party, he got waylaid with other duties at the time.

8. You may have already been advised to make sure to take some time for you and FH during the big day. But try to make some time just for yourself, too.
One of the things I found during the wedding was that from 7 am I had no time to myself. There was always someone in my room, always someone who had a question, always a well-wisher and always someone ready with a camera. It can become challenging to keep energy levels up when you’re “on the show” for twelve or more hours at a stretch. I found myself wishing for a few minutes every few hours or so just to be able to go somewhere quiet and collect my thoughts / recharge my batteries / have a glass of water / check my lipstick or just be uninterrupted for a few minutes so I could then enjoy the day more.

7. Which brings me to assigning a poking coordinator…
Having a trusted family member or friend help create space around you can be extremely helpful and allow you to enjoy those hugs…
Yes, you read this right, and this is actually the fab suggestion of fellow Tribesmaid. I’m a very huggy person but really started to get tired of so many people touching me throughout the day. At some point in the day, photos started to show me wincing/pulling away from loved ones/turning glassy eyed just because I had reached sensory overload.

Having a trusted family member or friend help create space around you can be extremely helpful and allow you to enjoy those hugs… but to also make sure you don’t OD on being stroked before the end of the day.

6. If you find yourself freaking out a little, do something more “normal.”
Yes, I had my awesome shoes, my awesome dress, my awesome OTHER dress and every decoration that made me and FH smile under the sun. It was most certainly Our Party. However, there were times in the day I felt distant from it all. There were times I still felt disconnected from everything that was happening. I reached a real turning point in the evening when I was tired of feeling like someone other than myself –- comfy clothes and comfy shoes aside. I put down the bubbles and grabbed a beer instead and found an old friend who sat for ten minutes and told me about her life for a while.

I should say that I drink bubbles outside of weddings so swapping champers for beer wasn’t really the issue. But it was such a relief to not talk about me, the wedding or our hopes for the future. Having those ten minutes to sit in the back corner, drink a beer and chatter on about nothing at all really helped me feel more like myself again. If you have a friend, who doesn’t feel obligated to only talk about your wedding, spending a little time with them could be a welcome break!

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